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Tuesday, 21 September 2010

Any Indication Of What Happened To The Silures





Question on Twitter
@Jonessurname @RCAHMWales any indication of what happened to the Silures? #Romanhistory



Response 
Having been fully conquered by the Roman army by about AD78, the elite of the tribe began to cooperate with the occupying forces and in a few years the civitas or canton of the Silures was constituted with its capital at Caerwent (see Cadw guide). The capital lasted into the fifth century, and the descendants of the tribe probably formed the basis of one of the Early Medieval kingdoms that emerged in south and south-east Wales.

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2 comments:


Shan Morgain
said...

The evidence is high that the Silures were never actually conquered by Rome. Instead they fought a hard and successful 30 years of guerrilla wars and seem to have negotiated a peace agreement.

Where Rome did effect a conquest they were quick to record their crushing aftermath. See the Vercingetorix and Boudiccan uprising; also see the claim to have "eradicated" the Ordovices, early allies of the Silures as recorded by Caesar and Tacitus reswpectively. But Tacitus glides over the end of the Silurian wars saying only that Frontinus "subdued" them.

That the Silures had a lengthy background of negotiations with the Romans through trade and hostage taking, and subsequently quite quickly held the delegated authority to run their own civil province, is strikingly unlike most other Roman 'conquests.'

For a lot more on the Silures see
www.housemorgain.co.uk/celtic-index/article/silures-48-1.html

Anonymous said...

Agree with the comment above!Even Tacitus said the Silures were never changed by cruelty or clemency, and they were left to keep their chieftains and run their own affairs.

Tacitus annals - When most of the Britons were subdued the Romans were kept to route by the single state of the Silures alone.

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